Archive | April, 2013

A Student Take on Undergraduate Exhibition

22 Apr

To say I was impressed by the Undergraduate Exhibition Poster session would be an understatement. As a student enrolled in the College of Communications, I did not realize how completely removed I happened to be from the science community.

Students from all Penn State Campuses presented their research on Wednesday, April 9th in various disciplines including arts and humanities, engineering, health and life sciences, physical sciences, and social and behavioral sciences.

Students shared their research on large posters to passers-by in hopes of being awarded the Gerald A. Hauser Award, the award given to the best overall project.

While much of the scientific findings seemed to be in a foreign language to me, I found the students at the exhibition to be inspiring. The passion they held for their research, as well as the time and energy spent executing it, radiated from within them.

“These are my peers that are going places,” I thought to myself after leaving.

One student that I spoke with, Kelly Carey, told me that she and her team had created a methanol detector for Kenyans to use to test if a common alcohol, Chang’aa, was toxic or not. This device is being used in Kenya today to save those who could have otherwise been plagued with blindness and/or death from drinking the Chang’aa.

The fact that my fellow Penn Staters are completing groundbreaking research – and making DIFFERENCE – is extremely admirable!

It is my hope that Penn State students, such as Kelly, will receive more recognition within our community from administrators and especially from fellow students.

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Aloha Mahalo

7 Apr

Yes, I’m in Hawaii.  No I’m not really on vacation.  I’m attending a Society for American Archaeology meeting.  Penn State is well represented at this meeting by faculty, students and former students who are now faculty at other universities.

Each year, sometime during the meeting, there is a Penn State gathering.  There’s usually a theme.  The year after Bill Sanders died, film footage of him in Mexico and Central America formed the backdrop of the party.

This year is another occasion, or rather two. Dean Snow, professor of anthropology and former head of the department is really retiring after teaching part time for a while.  In conjunction with his retirement, he and his wife are setting up the Snow Award in Archaeology to honor and recognize outstanding academic achievement by an undergraduate student whose studies are focused in archaeological science in the College of the Liberal Arts.  They have put aside $10,000 to be matched by donations from others.  Twenty thousand dollars are needed to establish a fund for student support.

I received an M.A. and a Ph.D. from the department and Dean Snow was on my dissertation committee.  I’ll undoubtedly donate in his honor.  But I was thinking, he isn’t the first faculty member to donate money to his department on retirement.  Apparently many of our faculty think enough of our students and the university to donate upon retirement or at some other time.

The Penn State Anthropology party at this meeting is always fun.  I get to see people I went to school with and to catch up a little.  I found out one of my classmates made tenure.  Another moved to South Carolina.  Many people who are usually here did not come because of the cost, and those that do come are obviously well employed in the field, so it isn’t a perfect indicator of how the department is doing.  However, I’m always impressed by what these former students are doing now and how Penn State influenced their research and their choice of jobs.

This year I also spent part of the party time interviewing a professor because just that morning I’d received a notice that he was publishing a paper in 5 days.  I sent him an e-mail only to find out he was at the conference.  So I took the time to do the interview.

I don’t usually do interviews in the middle of a party, but we sat down at the dining room table and began to chat.  I do always have a reporter’s notebook in my purse.  He is an environmental archaeologist and doing some really interesting things.

Douglas Kennett was at the University of Oregon before he joined Penn State a short while ago.  During that time he was looking into dates of Maya sites and made arrangements with the University of Pennsylvania to sample a door lintel they had in their museum.  Then he moved here as a full professor and is now publishing on that work out of the Pennsylvania State University.  So as he told me, it is a Pennsylvania story.

But it is really about the Maya city of Tikal, sapodilla trees, radiocarbon 14 dating and linking the Long Count calendar to the European calendar.

Ambitious, but truly fascinating and likely to provide hints not only of what the Maya faced climate wise, but what we may face in the future.

Lights Out III: Student Update on Exercise

3 Apr

Penn State researchers work closely with students. The Lights Out game scenario is one example of this interaction between researchers and students in the College of Information Sciences and Technology. Here’s the idea: What would you do if you were a community leader and your town was knocked off the grid? This is the third edition in a series of student-written posts about their participation in this capstone course. In the future, we’ll feature more posts from the students as they progress through the Lights Out scenario. To learn more, check out some background information about the course in this post.

McCracken

As far as sandwiches go, this one was pretty bad.

I sat on a rock by the side of the road.  I was only about a half-mile from town, but didn’t feel like answering any questions from passersby while I lunched on a beef jerky, mustard, and celery sandwich.  It was what I’d had in the fridge when this whole thing started.  This damned power outage.

It’s been two days since everything died.  On the whole, I couldn’t complain about the response from the town.  We had good leadership who could make difficult decisions quickly.  They first set up support for the elderly and people in the hospital.  That course of action alone saved a lot of lives.  They also began to immediately try to get a head-count of everyone in town.  The town Police and the Fire Company were keeping track of any reports of missing people and organizing searches.  As for myself, I was a messenger.

Messengers were among the first groups to be set up.  The Municipal Manager wanted to establish the extent of the power outage, and to see how the Amish and people in different parts of the village were reacting.  Messengers were given bicycles and sent to different parts of town to deliver messages and to take messages from one part of town to the other.  A good idea, I thought.  It wasn’t as good as a phone, but it at least gave people some form of communication.

As I sat eating, I was distinctly aware of the weight of the .38 in my pocket.  When I was younger, it was important to me that I got a pistol and conceal-carry permit.  Upon settling down in McCracken it didn’t matter as much.  The crime rate in a village such as McCracken was next to nothing.  Now, though, I was glad to have it.  Rumor was that shortly after the power went out there were scared citizens trying to force their way into the gun shop.  In a time of crisis, it isn’t evil people that we must fear most.  It’s the scared ones that’ll kill you.

I finished my sandwich and stood.  My bicycle, a 21-speed Diamondback, was leaning against a nearby tree.  I had a few messages for the town leaders from the Amish community.  That had been my assignment that morning: to deliver and collect messages from the Amish.  They didn’t seem to have too much to say regarding the power outage.  Not to me, at least.  I got on the bike and pedaled toward town.  They wanted me to be back before 1:00.  They’d have another task for me then.

I delivered my notes to the Sheriff.  At the moment, the Municipal Manager and Town Leadership Committee were behind closed doors discussing courses of action.  Word was they’d soon open volunteer positions for local leadership positions regarding things like providing shelter and rationing.  When the positions opened, I’d try to get one.  For now, though, I’ll stick with my job as a messenger.

After making my delivery, I rode to the firehouse.  The Fire Chief had just returned from a search for a local kindergartener.  The boy had gotten lost south of the school. “How’d it go, Chief?” I asked.  We hadn’t been close friends before this crisis, but he ran the messengers as part of his duties and seemed to trust me with some of the more important tasks.  The first message collection trip he’d given me had been to the hospital.

“He’s with his family now.  Found him in a tree.  We gave him some crackers and got him home fine.  You finish that Amish run?”

I nodded.  “All letters were delivered to the Sheriff.”

The Chief grunted approvingly.  “I said I’d have another run for you when you got back, but Ben got back from WECO Fairgrounds early so I sent him instead.  The Amish run is a long one, anyway.  There are no more runs for you today.  Head home if you want.  That’d be helpful, actually.  I want someone I trust to be in your part of town.  We had to handle a grassfire at a house two doors away from you earlier, and some of your neighbors got a bit worked up about it.  They might benefit from a visit from you.”

I shrugged.  “I’ll go home then.  You’ll know where to find me.  I’ll come by tomorrow morning for another run.”

“I’ll be here,” he said.

As I rode home I kept glancing up at the sky.  I didn’t mention it to anyone yet, but I haven’t seen either a plane or contrails in the sky for two days.  It had been sunny and clear ever since the power outage, but there was no evidence of aircraft.  The planes at our local airport wouldn’t start, just like nobody’s vehicle worked.  Surely, though, the power couldn’t be out everywhere.  That was unthinkable.

Longview    
It has been a week since the lights went out, I’m still not entirely sure what happened or when they’re going to come back on. I’ve been trying to balance taking care of my family with increasing demands as a result of the power outage, but this is proving to be very challenging. My kids spent the first night stuck at the school, thankfully their teachers and principal kept them occupied and looked after everyone. The morning after and the next day a couple of community members were able to bring a bunch of the kids into town from the school in horse drawn wagons. Thankfully, my kids were in one of these wagons and are now home with their father.

As if the lights going out weren’t enough of a problem, we the community leaders, have also had to deal with a number of reports of safety and security problems around town. The first night reports kept coming in that several of the industrial facilities were at critical levels and might explode. Thankfully, technicians were able to deal with these problems, and things seem to be stable for now. We’ve also had to deal with reports that groups of people have been wondering through town looting abandoned cars. I’m not really sure what we should do. We don’t have the manpower right now to stop this.

Given the multitude of problems facing Longview, the Mayor tasked me and the four other community leaders with developing an action plan. We needed to figure out what’s most critical and how to address it. The major wanted to know who our most at risk people are and what were going to do to help them. He also wanted us to start thinking about what the community needs to survive since the power doesn’t seem like its going to come back on soon.

We spent most of the past few days trying to track down old reports and maps of Longview to complete this plan, but the real help has been volunteers coming into the office with reports about what’s going on. We all soon realized that information was the most valuable thing right now. We talked about ways of sharing information with the community and decided that putting information out was the best way to relieve some of the fear people are experiencing. We’ve had volunteers go around town and let everyone know to check the Tavern’s for information as we plan on either posting information or having someone keep everyone informed.

We’ve still got a lot of problems to address. Most of the kids are back, but we need to get them to their parents, many of which are out of town. Our large elderly population in the community and residing at the elderly care facility is also concern. Without power those that require substantial medical care are not going to get help. Thankfully, families have been visiting and attempting to take care of their relatives, but we still have a large number of elderly with not relations. We need to find a way to help as many as we’re able.

Food and supplies seem to be okay at the moment, but all the community leaders agree, this is going to be significant problem very soon. A lot of us thought the power was going to come back on in a day or so, but ‘this event’ is proving to be bigger and more widespread than we expected. We’ve came up with an action list for the Mayor but now it’s up to him to decide what we do next. I’m glad that my family is at home and safe for the moment, but I’m starting to get really worried about what’s going to come next.

Smithville Blog

“It’s been nearly a week since the lights went out. In the first 24 hours people were in denial, some even looked at the “event” as we’re come to call it as a break from the monotony of everyday life. Lots of folks went to bars to party, others pulled out their grills and had impromptu BBQs inviting people off the street (many times they were the strangers who had wondered in from the road). It was one big party in downtown Smithville. The reverie lasted about two days before people began to realize this was not just a transient thing; that things would get much worse before they got better.

For me and a small group of planners, we didn’t even have two days…as members of the Mayor’s Emergency Operations Center (EOC) Task Force we were given our marching orders. The mayor told us to get our own houses in order then come back to work to address the city’s issues. A few members of the EOC never made it home that first night. Without transportation, if you lived outside town, you simply had no way of getting there. I was more fortunate and for me it was only may cat that I had to worry about. I jogged the three mile home to my apartment and knowing I might not be back for several days, turned kitty loose. She was a barn cat to begin with; I knew she would survive.

I didn’t stay long in my apartment. I grabbed a few personal items, packed some clothes and packed as many water bottles as I could carry, then turned around and headed back toward city hall. I decide to walk back, taking a circuitous route through a maze of stalled vehicles. I wanted to survey the streets all while contemplating the list of issues we were going to face. With everything I had on my mind, I just couldn’t help thinking, “What are these people going to do, when the party stops…”

I was not the first person back. Those who never left (either they had no one to go home to or no way of getting there) were already at work. The Mayor left us with a set of things to address, but the first we needed to do was to get organized by: defining the chain of command, devising a communication plan and assigning roles within the team (so to not duplicate effort).

And then the real work began. We were told to “take stock” – of the big things first and the most critical; saving lives first; then preservation of assets, and only then look toward recovery. We were to approach this as a crisis.

To begin with, we knew we had folks out there in a bad way, some would not make it through the night let alone a week. We needed to identify those in most need. BUT we also needed to triage our problems. Some could not be saved – the critically ill, non-ambulatory and those dependent on medical devices to live. There are many others, however that could and should be saved, the very young, especially those whose parents were caught out of town.

Someone found a paper copy (rare but true) of a SWOT Analysis that was conducted on Weaver County in 2024. This turned out to be a good framework to view our situation. We started to look at our situation from four points of view:  Strengths, Weaknesses, Opportunities and Risk.

We’ve been at it now for several days and we still have a LOT of work to do to figure out how to deal with this crisis. But we are making small strides. For my part, I was tasked with dealing with the young and very old. I gathered volunteers to survey the hospitals, elderly care facilities and all of the schools and all of the day care centers in town. Getting kids home or cared for was priority number one for me…dealing with folks on the other end of the continuum was second.

We had better luck with the kids than we did the elderly and sick. We lost some 200 folks in the first two days alone (probably more). By day two, critical care staffs were few and far between. Many of the dead were simply left in place, Since then we have established up a mortuary service (actually several location have been established since transportation continues to be an issue).

The partying has not stopped for some folks and lawlessness is becoming more of an issue as folks run out of essentials. The first flash mobs emerged at dawn on day three. I think everyone had the same idea – get to the supermarket, gas station, food bank, convenient store or any other place than held significant food and water. The partyers went for the booze and several shooting incidents at downtown bars resulted. Families are being preyed upon and several incidents of robbery have been reported. We are just seeing the opening salvo…the Mayor has already started a new checklist of things to address. Law and Order at the top of that list.

In the meantime, we are continuing our SWOT analysis and will brief the Mayor in the morning…no one will sleep tonight.”

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